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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Detroit News - 29 Maerz 1972 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Detroit News
Detroit, Michigan
29 Maerz 1972


lucille dupree says she's detroit's champ

"i take my work very seriously!"

"when i go to work, i'm dressed up. i wear a top hat, tails, bow tie, and dickey over a white bathing suit."

so spke lucille dupree, lady wrestler from detroit, who believes she is the city's best.

"i figure if somebody beats me, they must have tricked me in some way."

the years of dislocated hips, water on the knee, broken arms, and an occasional smashed nose are over, she says.

'i've been wrestling for 10 years and have it down to a science." there days there are only a fes sprains, bruises, and torn ligaments.

lucille comes from a french speaking community in rhode island, got her start in boston where she hoped to make the roller derby. "i got into wrestling by accident -- just helping somebody out in the arena where i used to skate."

"i trained for a couple of months, but i really leaned everything in the ring -- you might say from experience."

"it was a hard way to learn."

lucille was the new england women's champion for six years. two years ago a promoter lured her to detroit. she's often seen at cobo and on local television and sometimes travels to sports arenas around the country and in canada.

twice she wrestled in japan for four months, and hopes to go back.

"did you know that the japanese are a superior race? those japanese girls are fantastic when it comes to wrestling, there's no one in the world like them!"

lucille tries boxing once but "didn't like it too much." two years ago at coobo she fought mary jane mull.

"she was using her fists to beat me at wrestling. i got mad and grabbed the microphone and publicly challenged her to a boxing match.

"a week later we put the gloves on. i think i won, but the way we boxed it was hard to tell."

if lucille has one ambition, it's to beat the "fabulous moolah" who holds the women's world title in wrestling.

"i've had tag team matches with her, but i want a title bout. i think maybe i could take her."

moolah, lucille charges, has stayed on the top for 20 years bcause "she fights dirty. she knows all the little tricks -- just when to do something really nasty. every time i try to slip something like that in, the referee cathes me."

sneaking in the little nasties, lucille said, is grounds for a fine. too many fines brig a ring suspension.

"good wrestling is all strategy. you've got to out-think your opponent, think a couple of holds ahead. the key is cocentration. you've got to put the fans and the noise and the ballho out of your mind. and just keep concentrating.

like you've got to be scientific about it."

"i guess my best hold is the drop kick, although im good with the sleeper, jackknife, or reverse slam. i'm small and fast. that's what puts me over."

lucille stands 5 foot 2 inches tall and weighs 126 1/2 pounds with a shape that any woman could envy.

'i don't like that brawny look. you can get that from lifting weights, and i don't lift weights."

instead she goes through calisthenics and isometrics twice a day., three sets at a session, a routine that totals two to three hours of ecercise daily.

no white bread or potatoes. lots of liver, steaks, and fruits, plus liver pills and vitamin c.

wrestling pays well, lucille says, but its a arlife fo a woman, and because of the traveling, no good at all for a married woman.

still, she wishes the girls going itno the sport today would work harder at it. "they're too interested in meeting they guys or they want to get famous too quick."

"they don't take their work seriuosly."

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Los Angeles Times - 13 May 1971 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles, California
13 May 1971


Injured Blassie told to retire by doctor

veteran wrestler freddie balssie suffered serious eye damage in his match with john tolos friday night at the olympic auditorium and will be out of action for several months according to dr. bernhart schwartz, state athletic commiiission physician.

"it is problematic how long he will be out," said dr. schwartz wednesday. "the injury takes several months to heal. i recommended that he retire, but i doubt that he will."

blassie, who was discharged from south hoover hospital wednesday, suffered the injury when styptic powder, described by dr. schwartz as "very irritating, causing corneal burn" was allegedly rubbed into his left eye.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

18.07.2007 08:06 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Tampa Tribune - 14 Februar 1973 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Tampa Tribune
Tampa, Florida
14 Februar 1973


king dory, queen bonnie rule

king rex farrior jr. and queen wynnette howell were not the only royalty crowned in tampa lasted night.

concurrent, very nearly, with the coronation of ye mystic krewe of gasparilla at the curtis hixon hall, a mile west under somewhat different circumstances but before a far more enthusiastic assemblage of subjects, another king and queen were assuming thrones.

they were king dory of the house of funk and bonniw queen bonnie of the house of watson. their court was the mystic world of professional wrestling.

though king dory funk jr. and queen bonie watson came by their titles at fort hesterly armory somewhat differently than the new rulers of gasparilla, they too are supreme in their special domain and doubtless held in comparable adulation by their followers.

and it must be acknowledged that while king rex and queen wynnette ascended to their thrones amid satin and lace and the smell of perfume, king dory and queen bonnie fought their way to theirs in a world of sweat and grimace and threats of doom.

the hesterly coronoation ceremonies were preceded by two ealry jousts matching muscular cavaliers performing in preliminaries before the standing room only crowd. blue-trunked bob bruggers, a former miami dolphin football player, rather quickly disposed of black-trunked, goateed and tatooed phil robley who was no favorite with the crowd, they gesturing back at him when he'd leer at them after their boos. he even earned an isolated bird or two.

next in an interesting match-up, a curly-haired, handsome jewish wrestler in red trunks named mark lewin finally gave skin-headed geran hans schmidt the just-due the crwod thought he deserved. schmidt wore black pants with boots, and aggrogantly defied, to no avail of course, referee corsica gene's decision favoring lewin, often the victim of low germanic blos, corsica had indicated.

now it was time for the selection of the quuen, to be decided in combat between the reigning monarch, bonnie queen bonnie watson, a poular ruler, and challenger kay noble, a spry contestant who wore a leopard-skin one piece bathing suit type and and who also quickly fell into disfavor the the crowd. she was in frequent shouting matches with ringsiders, including one off-duty cop.

there were moments when queen bonnie, a longtime tampa resident, seemed to be in terrible jeopardy of losing the florida women's wrestling title, particularly when kay had her by the throat, but showing regal cunning and resolution, the champ prevailed after flinging noble over the top ring-rope and onto the floor below where she landed in a most ignoble position -- on her keester.

the courtly chaplain held her robe

corsica gene gave the match and the crown (in wrestling, however, it is a belt) to quen bonnie and the courtly american legion chaplain at ringside returned kay noble her lounging robe he had held for her during the ceremony.

three more competitions of especial interest followed before the coronation's highpoint, one of them a surprise.

in the first, a young prince of the people, mike graham, son of eddie, after some anxious moments, handled unpopular chris markoff, the shouter of the evening. markoff would ohhhhhhhhhh, quite loudly, when graham would force it from him with a stragle-hold, arm-bend, or some other similar inducement and the crowd would immediately echo him. indeed, at times they ohhhhhhhh-ed along with markoff in disgust.

next southern champ buddy colt, regarded as an unsavory too, clung to his title by working over popular young oklahoman jerry brisco when the people thought the ref was inattentive. colt is a barrel-chested, acrobatic sort who also waers the black well. he has an absolutely menacing scowl, with accompanying bad-eye. his win was soundly jeered, a circumstance which, in truth, seemed to please the calloused colt.

george was a beaut

perhaps the disappoinment of the coronation night to the aptrons came when big bad john and tim woods, their favorites, fell victim to more trickery missed by referee stu schwatz, the people thought. perhaps their dismay was doubled because of the nature of the winning team which was composed of blond, mustched bobby shane, regarded by the mutitutes as an unsavory sort, and gorgeous george jr. george wore peroxide blond curls fresh from curlers and those in a hairnet, two blue ribbons (which the chaplain also kept during the contest) and lace on his red boots.

gorgeous was just that. the crowd made many reccommendations to him during the fight, particularly when he assumed as especialy dainty aire, non of which hw followed. it was perhaps the most unpopular decision of the night, and it set the secene properly for the combat to decide who'd be the world heavyweight wrestling champion, as well as winner of the premier event of the gasparilla wrestling spectacular -- in short, who'd be the king.

dory funk jr. entered as the champ-king, popular dark-haired part-cherokee jack brisco the challenger. funk is out of amarillo and has held the title for four years. he's a fine athlete, solid american, former west texas state football player and popular most places.

brisco was twice national wrestling champ when at oklahoma state, then turned to the pro circuit and had lived in tampa four years. brother jerry had wrestled before him tuesday night, and lost to heavy buddy colt.

clearly the crowd was for brisco, and for the first 15 minutes of clutching and body-slams, leg-twisting, arm-ulling and neck chopping, even a bit of undetected hair-pulling, brisco had the first fall and was on his way to a staggering upset. it had been this time four years ago, and here, that funk had won the world championship and first crowned king. it was tense, amd loud, and high drama to the subjects of that intriguing world.

but, after 8 minutes of the second go, funk seemed to regain strength from some hidden supply -- though in ruth he surely seemed barely to be hanging on at times -- and with a mighty thrust upwards of both feet hurled brisco (as the doomed kay noble had gone) over the top ring rope, northside. he plunged downward onto the concrete and lay still.

just before the time limit count of 20 from ref stu schwatrz, brsico managed to haul mimself partly back onto the mat where funk flung his 240 pounds onto him for a pin and the second fall.

only three minutes rest are allowed between falls.

jack's concerned brother rushed out of the wings and implored the ref to give his kin more time to revive, for he lay there quite still. young brisco even tried, it seemed, to drag the limp body of jack out of the ring to safety.

but before he could become his brother's keeper, funk, himself seemingly dazed by punishment of the falling here and there, was tearing at the lifeless brisco, the crowd meanwhile screaming in unison: "go jack go! go jack go!"

jack responded to to their call momentarily, but it was not to be. funk disposed of him for a second fall rather quickly and it was at that moment, about the time king rex was ascending to another throne of importance at curtis hixon, that referee schwatrz hoisted the weary arm of the winner heavenward.

the other coronation was now completed too.

king dory had joined his queen, bonnie, as rulers of their somewhat mystic kingdom, thier subjects departing every bit as gratified by the evening as the crowd at curtis hixon.

one fellow said he'd bet even more. but then he's never experienced the joys and delights of a gasparilla ball and coronation

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Tampa Tribune - 18 June 1972 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Tampa Tribune
Tampa, Florida
18 June 1972


Jim Selman

Fatherly Interference

it's going to become awfully tempting in the eddie and mike graham father-son relationship for one not to interfere in what the other is doing.

not even when one is locked in mortal combat and suffering excruiating pain can there be interference, except at the risk of defeat by disqualification.

forty-two year old eddie graham, a veteran of 25 years in professional wrestling, and 20 year old mike are about to launch a career as father-son tag team partners.

it will be a lifetime dream come true for eddie graham.

mike? well as a 3 year old toddler he began hanging around the gyms where his dad trained and wrestled and it was about all he ever knew. as impossible as it seemed, he, too, began to hope hemight someday team with his dad in the ring.

after all, not many men achieve such a relationship in sports or public life.

in the last 20 years, there have been only five father-son wrestling teams of note. of these, only two won sufficient fame to be generally recognized by the average sports fan.

that would be leo and gino garibaldi of california, who were fighting in the days when old channel 38 provided our first televised wrestling, and then dory funk sr., and his two boys, world heavyweight champion dory jr. and terry of texas.

lesser knowns are len and chip rossi of tennessee, buddy, ron, and robert fuller (buddy has succeeded eddie graham as the wrestling matchmaker in florida so graham can wrestle full-time again), and les, jack, and roy welch.

debuts in garden

mike graham is like a young bull. he won the state aau championship three times as well as the junior olympics title. a year ago last november in tallahassee he bench pressed 430 pounds to set a state record in his 198 pound weight class.

he has been wrestling professionally about a month, has become involved in one of those characteristic wrestling fueds with bobby shane and the first of july will make his debut in madison square garden.

eddie graham is not certain whether that appearance will be a tag team venture or whether mike will go as a siingle. in the latter case, eddie graham also will appear on the card as a single.

how do the grahams view this unusual relationship?

well, daddy graham is worried about the boy.

"with mike just starting, i hope he isn't overmatched and gets hurt or something," the veteran wrestler said.

"it's a strange thing, really. of course, i'm really proud that he has the desire to go along with the life i have lived. at the same time just because he weighs 220 pounds and is strong, he's still a little boy to me and i worry about him.

"when i was 19 i had my jaw broken. my leg was broken when i was 21.

"so, naturally, you kinda live in a little bit of terror that these things might happen. but i guess it is part of life. you gotta grow up sometime.

"i feel, too, like all parents, that he's over the hump as far as drugs and things are concerned. i'm sure he came in contact with that. but i am proud that he never fooled with it. i would like to think that it was our association, that he trusted us and thought enough of us to take our advice.

" there re so many pitfalls that young people get into today. they wreck their lives before they really get a chance."

almost blinded

wrestling has been good to edie graham, although it has severely crippled him and, for a while, almost blind.

in 1963, the great malenko salmmed him backwards across his knee and eddie suffered a rotation of the lumbar which sidelined him for a year.

some orthopedic people told him he was through wrestling. he was not.

in 1968, a heavy window in the fort hesterly dressing room somehow became unattached, fell and struck graham on the head as he was dressing for a match. he had to have about 100 stitches taken on his skull. worse than that, graham, who is blind in the left eye, almost lost the sight of his right eye as the retina was torn. he had to have surgery in houston to save it. again, he was told he was through as a wrestler.

but in september of 1970, eddie graham wrestled again in the gator bowl in acksonville.

he's held the southern heavyweight title five times and thre times was co-holder of the world tag team championship.

in 1964 he defeated freddie blassie in atlanta. blassie was recognized as heavyweight champion by several states, but not the national wrestling alliance. graham did not claim the title.

he did fight champions lou thesz and gene kiniski in 1 hour no decisions.

graham took over l & g promotions in tampa from cowboy luttrall, whose health was failing. promotions in the state by the two men have provided something like $50,000 in percentages for the florida sheriff's boys ranch in live oak and a special benefit show by the wrestlers in live oak turned over another $3,700 to the ranch. graham himself donated his entire purse of $1,013 from a fight with dick murdoch recently to the tampa boys' club. he once had a boys' camp in northwest hillsborough county and let many underprivileged kids get the feel of the good life there.

graham has been a god, philanthropic citizen. he's had many successes and big moments.

but to have his own kid team with him? that's something else.

"it's knd of a strange feeling," said the boy, mike. "when he's out there and i know the hold hurts, he hurts. but i gotta get used to it and can't interfere to the point where we get disqualified.

"it is inbelievable for me to team with him.

"but i would imagine it probably is even more so for him."

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

15.08.2007 08:26 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Atlanta Constitution & Journal - 15 June 1974 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Atlanta Constitution & Journal
Atlanta, Georgia
15 June 1974


Wrestler's Lib and now, a lady promoter

Ann Gunkel didn't expect the photographer. she excused herself to comb her hair and di a little primping.

"after all," she said, "i've got to stay ahead of paul jones."

she smiled an infectious smile.

ann gunkel is a rarity in the field of sports. a wrestling promoter. not only a promoter, but a lady promoter. not only a lady, but a lovely lady. somehow it seems incongruous, beauty among all the 'beasts.' oh, there was a aldy promoter in los angeles, but she sort of retired.

paul jones is the 'other' wrestling promoter in town. for years he had the professional sport to himself. the late ray gunkel, ann's husband, was part of thejones operation. but after gunkel died from a freakish injury in the ring, ann said jones "restructed the organization leaving me out" and she went into combat.

she set up a wrestling emporium on the other side of the street and landed 27 of the top grapplers. "only one wrestler stayed i the other outfit and he was a local gu," she said. "and today all 27 are still in our sanctioning body."

ann gunkel doesn't look like a fighter, but the facts prove otherwise.

"at first, she said, "the national wrestling alliance (nwa) frowned upon a woman in wrestling.

"a lot of people were against me. they said it was too tough for a woman. and now they're saying i'm too tough for the sport.
i told them that the nwa stood for 'no women allowed.' sure, at the beginning, the whole thing was completely new for me, and it was difficult. but i have it organized now and it is functioning well.

"we have our shows here, of course, but it is much more than that. our wrestlers are out every night of the week in surrounding towns.

"we have grossed more than $1 million in a year's time. the next week i am going to puerto rico to sign up that country's champion, carlos colon, and perhaps promote there."

sure, she said, there are raised eyebrows when wrestlers and promoters see the boss is a lady.

she laughed.

"but one promoter told me it was kind of nice not having to go to dinner with an old wrestler with cauliflower ears."

mrs. gunkel retains her perspective.

"oh, wrestling is not the only thing in my life," she said. "i have a step-son and two small children and ibelong to the pta and i am a room mother and i play tennis and love to have large tennis parties. and the other day when someone called on business, i told them they had to wait because i had a load in the washing machine.

"i don't see why a woman can't be in a competitive business and retain her femininity."

no problem there for ann gunkel.

there were those who said she couldn't fight the competitive battles.

"but, she said, "it's like the nfl. it never thought the world football league would pop up and compete and it did. then, when i was told it couldn't be done, i checked the tablets of moses and found there was nothing there that said i couldn't do it."

mrs. gunkel, a one-time drum majorette at west fulton, had some business experience. she worked in hotel management on the west coast, under the direction of actress doris day, and became accustomed to the pressure of meeting people.

she smiles.

"still," she said, "when i went on tv with ed capral for my first show i forgot the names of all the wrestlers. just drew a blank. but the situation has improved."

wrestlers accept her as the boss, the businesswoman, but a few among the general public can't get used to the idea.

such as the coach from tennessee who wrote he was "avaiable for wrestling and dating." and the voice on the phone recording from the guy obviously under the influence.

:the first time he called he said he wanted a picture of ann gunkel," she said with a smile. "the next time he wanted a bathing suit picture. then a shot of me in a bikini. i'm glad he didn't call again."

wrestlers are usually regarded as nomads who move from town to town without any local interest, but mrs. gunkel said that wasn't true.

"ernie ladd speaks with kids at the local schools and encourages them to continue their education," she said. "at 6-8, 350, he is one of our more popular wrestlers. and you should see him eat 12 barbecued ribs before he fights. thatis just an appetizer until the main meal later."

she grew serious for a monent.

"going into business was therapy for my grief," she said. "it kept me busy and i enjoy it. but i never want to get so involved that i get jaded."

she has proved one thing. there are not two worlds, one for women and one for men.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

20.08.2007 17:00 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Baltimore Sun - 20 June 1972 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Baltimore Sun
Baltimore, Maryland
20 June 1972


Alan Goldstein

ladd asks respect for pro wrestlers

it's time for the sports media and the general public to stop looking down their noses at professional wrestlers and regarding them as a bunch of feeble-mided refugees from the circus sideshow doing somersaults to the tune of a greedy promoter.

nothing could be further from the truth, claims ernie ladd, the 6-9, 345 pound amn mountain who earned $115,000 on the grunt and groan circuit last year.

ladd, the former celebrated tackle for the san diego chargers and houston oilers, was in town yesterday to help promote his championship match with titleholder pedro morales at the civic center tomorrow night.

it seems to the casual follower that every wrestling bout is for some championship or other and it always ends with the challenger being disqualified for tossing the champion into the lap of the pretty blonde in the third row.

but this is the typical cynicism of non-believer, says ladd, who supports his raguments with more tahn his formidable frame.

"everybody who doesn't know any better knocks wrestling," he said. "but there were 30 or 40 wrestlers last year who earned between $40,000-$50,000. only about four or five boxers make that kind of meney. you see a lot of old boxers shining shoes, but you don't see any old wrestlers, do you.

in reply to the old charges that wrestling matches are about as honest as the roller games and horse racing, if you believe "mr. byrne", ladd contends that you can only fool the public for so long.

a wise guy

"i remember the story or pimo carnera, the ex-heavyweight champion, who became a wrestler," said ladd. "cernera went on a wrestling tour of italy. the first time he visited each city, he drew terrific crowds because of his name. but they saw he didn't know the first thing about wrestling. he was a triple-threat --stumble, fumble, and fall. the next time primo came to town he couldn't draw flies."

ladd, who contends he signed a richer contract with the houston oilers (it reportedly extends through 1989) than joe namath received from the new york jets, also thought wrestling would be mere child's play compared to the violent world of pro football.

"i remember my first wrestling match," he said. "i was a real wise guy. a super football player. they put me in with some guy who weighed only 225. well, he turned me every which way, but loose. he rubbed my nose in the mat for 25 or 30 minutes."

it convinced the giant ladd that he needed more than his substantial bulk to survive on the mat circuit. he "took his lumps for three years," but now is considered one of the more skilled wrestlers on the tour and one of the top draws.

asked why he gave up his lucrative football career, ernie said, "football was good to me, but i paid my debt to football. i found out in football that i wasn't a complete man. i could't spend much time with my family, and there were other things in life.

"in football, a coach could call me up at four in the morning and i'd have to lsiten to him. but, in wrestling, i can call my own shots. i don't have to wrestle if i don't feel like it. i take three months off every year. for me, football was just a stepping stone."

but ladd will never knock his old profession.

greats don't knock

"if you check the record, the guys like dave meggyesy, who knocked football, never really amounted to much," he said. "jim brown never knocked it. neither did the greats like alan ameche and raymond berry."

someone asked ladd the age-old question of whether an outstanding boxer could beat a topnotch wrestler.

"no way," he said. " he'd have to knock him out with his first punch or it would be all over in a matter of minutes."

ladd believes he could have been a heavyweight contender if he had concentrated on boxing instead of wrestling.

he has an opportunity durng football days in san diego when he spent a lot of time in the company of former light-heavyweight king archie moore.

"he tried to get me to box, but i was happy just playing him billiards," ernie laughed, and the whole room shook.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

30.08.2007 08:52 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Honolulu Advertiser - 16 June 1982 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Honolulu Advertiser
Honolulu, Hawaii
16 June 1982


high chief fanene leifi pita maivia, known locally as professional wrestler peter maivia died sunday (june 13, 1982) of canver. he was 45.

maivia was born in western samoa and raised in new zealand, where he began his wrestling career. he went to england as a professional wrestler and wassigned by the producers of the early james bond film "you only live twice" to do a fight scene with actor sean connery, who played bond.

maivia went on to wrestle professionally in europe, the far east, and the u. s. mainland. he started wrestling in hawaii in the early 1960s and eventually became the first polyneasian promoter of professional wrestling in the islands. he also established the peter maivia wrestling school here.

maivia promoted several wrestling events in american and western samoa, tonga, and other southenr pacific islands,a nd about three years ago he was the main event in what is said to have been the largest spectator event ever held in western samoa -- an outdoor wrestling match in which he was the headliner. about 10,000 spectators are said to have attended.

friends may call 6 to 9 p.m. tomorrow and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. friday at borthwick mortuary. services 1 p.m. friday. burial at diamond head memorial park.

he is survived by wife, ofelia fuataga; daughter, mrs. mataniu feagaimaleata johnson of florida; grandson tuifeai dwayne johnson of florida; mother, mrs. peka papali'i of auckland, new zealand; two brothers in samoa; and a cousin, papali'itele siva afi, a professional wrstler here known as siva afi.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

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Achtung Toledo Blade - 3 July 1975 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Toledo Blade
Toledo, Arkansas
3 July 1975
Penny Breniser


volatile and venomous poffo forsakes baseball for wrestling

in the big-time wrestling program, randy poffo is billed as "volatile and venomous." But the 6-1 california beach-boy type, says he is anything but that.

"they just needed something to write in a hurry," the newcomer to toledo said.

poffo, who is originally from downers grove, ill., has now settled in toledo on alexis road, with his family. His father, angelo, and his brother, lanny are also professional wrestlers.

poffo claims to be the only professional baseball player turned professional wrestler.

the transition has not been easy. he has had to go into an intensive retraining program, which includes strenuous, daily workouts -- changing his baseball arms to atlas arms.

poffo largely played the position of catcher, with farm teams of the st. louis cardinals, cincinnati reds, and the chicago white sox.

in the four years he played in the minor leagues, his determination kept him alive.

however, with a reduction in the minor league teams, he feels that his stint is up in the baseball world, and he should look to something else.

so he turned to wrestling, since it is a "relative thing."

poffo contends he does not fit the professional wrestler image.

"i showed up at my promoter's in cut-off jeans, and everybody else was wearing trunks. there I was just off the beaches of florida and they wanted me to wear wrestling trunks," poffo said, adding that "a need for a gimmick was stressed."

yet, poffo told his promoter, he could not be anything that he really wasn't, and his image remained intact.

"i guess if I have a gimmick, it's that I have no gimmick."

he takes his wrestling seriously as he has all his athletic endeavors. yet, he holds little or no contempt for the likes of the sheik who puts on a floor show for the fans.

but for poffo, who stresses a need to be himself, not much flashiness will be apparent when he plays at the sports arena on july 6.

"i work hard at the sport, it is a full-time job for me," he said.

and if his efforts work as they did in baseball, he may manage to tread water.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

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Achtung Miami Herald - 9 July 1975 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Miami Herald
Miami, Florida
9 July 1975


Redskins sizing up 7-4 Giant

washington -- (upi) -- at a news conference worthy of paul bunyan and his great blue ox, babe, the Washington redskins suggested tuesday they were interested in signing a seven-foot four-inch, more than one-fifth of a ton professional wrestler, known as andre the giant, for defensive purposes.

in conjunction with a local wrestling promoter, tim temmerario, director of personnel of the redskins and joe theismann, a prospective starting quarterback replacement for sonny jurgenen, served as co-spokesman for the 425-pound behemoth.

temmerario, a veteran scout, acknowledged that andre (whose last name is roussimoff from grenoble, france) probably wouldn't be a contender for a defensive lineman's spot at carlisle, pa., when the redskins open their preseason camp sunday.

coughing a little, tim related that about four months ago redskin coach george allen told a staff meeting that he'd like to find something "unusual" for defensive purposes such as an agile seven-footer to create consternation in opposing ranks. temmerario said he got word of andre the giant and initiated possible free agent negotiations with promoter vince mc mahon.

"i wouldn't mind working him out," the redskin representative said of the 29 year-old andre who wears a 22-size shoe and has never attended a football game. he's certainly a hunk of material but he'd have to have more than size."

temmerario acknowledged that he had discussed the prospect off andre as an nfl player several times by phone and added that allen "talked to me this morning and encouraged me to come down to the news conference."

"we're interested in him," he said, "but there are problems such as his heavy wrestling schedule and the fact he makes so much money from it. however, nothing is impossible."

temmerario quickly added that the bushy-haired gigantic wrestler wasn't expected at carlisle. "I made the call to him" I'll admit that," he commented. "that's all I'll admit."

theismann, the former notre dame quarterback who played in the canadian pro league, told the news conference he had seen andre wrestle professionally on television. after firmly identifying himself as "only the mc," he commented: "with his size, I'll call andre 'sir'. I'd rather have him with me than against me"

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

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Achtung Los Angeles Times - 10 June 1952 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles, California
10 June 1952


LEONE, TORRES TEAM TO FIGHT DAMAGE SUIT

"It can't be done!" Wrestlers Baron Michele Leone, 216 pounds, and Enrique Torres, 225 pounds, sang in duet yesterday when the Baron demonstrated he couldn't possibly have "thrown" Torres from the ring in the Ocean Park Arena last January 5.

Leone, Torres and Mike Hirsch, arena proprietor, appeared in Santa Monica Superior Court yesterday for trial of a $30,000 damage suit, brought against them by Ian H. Caldwell and his wife Mary of 11690 Gorham Place, West Los Angeles.

The Caldwells allege they were injured while occupying the seat where Torres landed from the asserted toss.

"If I could forward pass a man like Enrique," the Baron declared, "I'd quit wrestling and try for the SC football team."

Both athletes explained that wrestlers may fall out of a ring but they can't be tossed. Joe Varga, who was refereeing on the night in question, said that if either man had fallen, been tossed or even run out of the ring on the night in question, he, the referee, would surely have known about it.

At request of the attorneys, Judge Stanley Mosk placed the case off calendar until September when it will be reset by stipulation.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

02.10.2007 08:32 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Achtung Detroit Free Press - 29 June 1960 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Detroit Free Press
Detroit, Michigan
29 June 1960
Bob Pille


as of today ruby's wrestlers share the wealth

out where the michigan sky isn't blurred by tall buildings, the pied piper wears cauliflower ears.

in the kalamazoos and kingstons, the millingtons and muskegons, the cries trampled out of evil opponents in the wrestling ring are golden and alluring tones.

a small-town fair isn't complete these days without the muscle men.

leaping larry chene is replacing chili suppers as a fund-raiser for the volunteer fire department. instead of needlepoint and the annual bazaar, the p-t-a offers ali bey and make more money.

in the caro high school band the wrestlers have bought the tuba player's horn and put the uniform on his back.

they are building the scorebaord at oxford high, sending dexter's senior class on a trip to washington.

they are helping the blind at utica and financing uniforms for romulus policemen, baseballs for kids in belleville, and checkerboards for the oldsters whose recreation is looked after by the uaw in ypsilanti.

the center line roatry club, left in a financial hole last year by rubinoffand his violin, bailed out this spring with culture surrounded by ring ropes.

hovering over all on philosophic resignation -- part angel and part businessman -- is old grappler bert ruby.

his code is simple: "it's not a vrtue to make money but to enjoy it." ruby does both.

he deals from the floer garden behind his home and from his paneled basement amid a connoisseur's store of imported liqueurs.

arrangements are standard. ruby provides the ring, fills it with referee and trained livestock, forwards posters and publicity.

his son al, soon to be 15 and an "a" student and hopeful three-sport athlete at oak park high, does a professional job of ring announcing and pens the advances.

for this rubu takes 60 per cnet of the gate.

for the remaining 40 per cent, the local co-promoter gets up a site and date, signs for a guarantee, and presumably labors dilligently at selling tickets.

the results are sometimes spectacular.

kingston, a thumb hamlet of 450, last week featured its first homecoming with a midawy, rodeo, chicken over open charcoal pits, and a one-night stand by the ruby troupe.

the arena was the school athletic field with double-decked snow fence around it.

some of the bleachers were from the caro fairgrounds, and some had been used for graduation at marlette high only the night before.

the hero was chene, known everybody from the man in the enxt car at the stoplight in lapeer to all the kids in kingston.

he gave away pictures, signed autographs, strolled the midway trailed by youngsters, crowned the homecoming queen and kissed all her court, subdued a villanous foe named bulldog brower, and signed more autographs at a teen record hop in the school gym.

a fortyish native of detroit's east side, chene is back after seven years on other circuits.

his delight at being home with the family is sharpened by the $500-$800 he brings weekly out of the hinderlands in paychecks.

ruby calls chene "an artist who projects himself," and this si where is philosophic resignation enters.

an old scientific wrestlers, he now confesses to halfway agreement with the fellow promoter who told him "watching a scientific wrestler is about as exciting as wtaching the grass grow."

"i teach beauty," sighs ruby. "but a kick in the stomach is more appreciated than 20 fast wristlocks."

ruby consoles himself with the feeling of doing his bit for the folks pyschologically.

"wrestling gives people an object to hate harmlessly," he says.

he is reconciled to crdue questions on fakery. "we let people separate fancy from reality as they wish."

ruby also consoles himself with money.

add together all the one-shot caros and kingstons and all the regular winter shoes where he often promotes alone in some 15 towns from grand rapids to monroe to sarnia.

the operation has grossed in the last year, by conservative guess, over $700,000.

detroit in the same period led the big towns of the nation with $545,000.

all that green stuff in the open fields ain't hay.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Sacramento Bee - 4 April 1978 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Sacramento Bee
Sacramento, California
4 April 1978


wrestler is down - match with health

olympic medalist chris taylor has wrestled most of his life. now, he's wrestling with his health.

the 6 foot 6, 470 pound taylor faces a year of tests and therapy in and out of the hospital to control his weight. chronic hepatitis and liver ailments have forced him to end -- at least temporarily --- his professional wrestling career and join the ranks of the unemployed.

taylor is 60 pounds heavier than he would like to be. he has gained 40 pounds in two months.

if he doesn't start losing it, doctors say his life may be on the line.

"i bloat up easy with liquids, " taylor said. "for some reason the liquids are not filtering out of me. the doctors know at i want to do. it's going to take from 10 to 12 months. it's going to be a year before i do anything else strenuous.."

taylor, the bronze medal winner in heavyweight wrestling at the 1972 munich olympics, said that although he doesn't have an enormous appetite, he has always had a problem controllong his weight. "i can walk by a mc donald's and gain three pounds."

he's a big man -- 60 inch chest, 20 inch biceps, and a 56 inch waist. he buys most of his triple extra large clothes through catalogs.

taylor was weel-known for his size before he won the medal in graco-roman wrestling in 1972. he had won two straight national collegiate athletic association titles while attending iowa state and seven consecutive amateur athletic union crowns. he was a big 8 conference athlete of the year in 1973.

the iowa state graduate tried pro wrestling with the like of gorilla monsoon and bruno sammartino. his contract called for him to receive about $400,000 over a five year period. "it was null and void if you didn't do the required work," he said. "the only thing i didn't like was the road," he said.

"a lot of times i'd wake up in the morning, thinking i had to catch a plane. then it hit me. i was already where i was supposed to be."

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

30.10.2007 09:38 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Achtung United Press International - 2 July 1979 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

United Press International
2 July 1979


Wrestling Star Chris Taylor dies

story city, iowa -- chris taylor, the two-time ncaa heavyweight wrestling champion and olympic bronze medalist from dowagiac, mich., who later became a professional wrestler, died at his home saturday night, he was 29.

the 395 pound wrestler had suffered from a variety of illnesses and retired from the professional ranks in 1977 for health reasons. he died of natural causes, the the exact cause of death was not immediately determined, said story county medical examiner donald w. powers.

a story city rescue unit was called to the taylor home butmedics were unable to revive him, powers said.

services were pending at stevens funeral home in ames. burial will be in dowagiac.

taylor had wrestled at iowa state university in ames for two years after transferring from muskegon mich. junior college.

while at isu, taylor wrestled at 400 pounds, compiling an 87-0 record -- 80 of the matches won by falls -- and winning the ncaa heavyweight wrestling title in 1972 and 1973.

in 1972, taylor won a bronze medal in the heavyweight freestyle competition at the olympics in muncih.

after competing at iowa state, taylor signed a five year professional wretsling contract for an estimated $100,000 a year.

dr. harold nichols, a veteran iowa state wrestling coach, said taylor recently underwent tests in iowa city. taylor had been hospitalized at the university of iowa hospitals seven weeks in the spring of 1978 while doctors treid to diagnose a liver ailment.

taylor is survived by his wife, lynn, and three year old daughter jennifer.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Fresno Bee - 28 April 1944 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Fresno Bee
Fresno, California
28 April 1944


SAN FRANCISCO. April 28—Round ring report! Being prejudiced, partial and biased in favor of the advantages of a circular ring for boxing over the traditional square "ring." Your reporter is a dead duck in the matter of reviewing the first showing of a round battle pit here the other night …We are in the predicament of a sailor shipwrecked on a raft—water, water everywhere, not a drop to drink …
The fact the wrestlers stole a march on boxing promoters and introduced the first circular ring may alter the case slightly in that the two professions are greatly different in footwork and other technique. The wrestlers could stage their performances knee deep in mud, as has been done and named Hindu style, or within a decagon, which is a 10 angled figure, and they would continue to produce their usual show, which pleases many patrons …

MEANT FOR BOXING
However, when we suggested the idea of a circular ring, we had boxing in mind, and a great many others now also are awaiting the mitt tossing program involving amateurs which will be put on in a round ring in May by the Marinship Athletic Club. Charley Hunter directing…
The amateur organization is causing to be constructed a circular ring which will be affixed to a round platform … It may come up as a three post affair, affording considerably more view to spectators than either the four poster or one with six posts, which has been considered …
After the wrestlers performed in their circular ring, supported by four posts, the general opinion was the device produced faster bouts by the very nature of its shape … Abe Kashey, a wrestler, said: “It forces you to keep hustling every minute. There are no corners to loaf in.”
Chief Inspector Don Shields of the state athletic commission said he thought that "for such a newfangled idea, the reaction was very favorable. The wrestlers who used it agreed it made them work faster .A number of improvements can be made. The ring certainly stood up under a severe test of heavy men banging into it. I would like to see it tried out for boxing.”

TRIAL IN BOXING
State athletic commission member Ed Pencevich said the circular ring inaugural was "very interesting. This type of ring promises to make contests much faster than before. I am looking forward to seeing boxing matches held in it." Oldest boxing publicist in California, in point of service, Leon Meyer, expressed the opinion the round ring held out “many interesting possibilities. All of the people I talked to want to see how it will work in boxing.” In conclusion we must print the comment of veteran Tim McGrath, who trained Sailor Tom Sharkcy in the 1890s: Sharkey never would have caught up with Jim Corbett in a round ring. (Grand old Sailor Tom was a slowfoot: Corbett possibly the fleetest in heavyweight ring history.)

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

19.11.2007 18:43 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Achtung Dallas Morning News - 28 October 1954 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Dallas, Texas
Dallas Morning News
28 October 1954


‘Mixed Bouts’ Law Unconstitutional

Austin, Texas – Texas’ law against professional fights between whites and Negroes is unconstitutional, the Austin Court of Civil Appeals held Wednesday.

The case involved I.H. (Sporty) Harvey, San Antonio Negro boxer.

It is one of the first decisions by a state court favoring Negroes in a segregation dispute. Most previous defeats for state segregation laws have come in the United States Supreme Court.

M.B. Morgan, commissioner of labor, announced that an appeal will be made to the Texas Supreme Court. Morgan supervises professional boxing and wrestling.

Morgan said that every wrestling promoter he knows opposes mixed matches. Some boxing promoters favor letting white met fight Negroes.

Associate Justice Robert G. Hughes wrote that the Texas law clearly violates this portion of the fourteenth amendment, United States Constitution:

“No state shall make of enforee any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life liberty or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.”

The case was returned for a new trial before Dist. Judge Jack Roberts of Austin. He had upheld the law.

Atty. Gen. John Ben Shepperd argued that professional boxing can be policed more closely by the state than can usual public activities.

The state contended that boxing might promote racial feelings which would cause riots.

“There was no finding that mixed fights would result in race riots or other disturbances of an unusual nature,” Judge Hughes reported.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

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Achtung Dallas Morning News - 25 April 1954 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Dallas, Texas
Dallas Morning News
25 April 1954


Fish Eating Prince, Big Game Hunter on Dallas Mat Programs

Antone Leone, a retired legislator from New York State, and Prince Maiava, a fish-eating member of the Samoan nobility, have one or two things in common. Both are proponents of the evil or no-holds-barred school of wrestling and both of them are highly emotional.

They will probably never meet in the ring, since Maiava performs his Samoan sword dance for Norman Clark, the Pappy’s Showland impressario, while Leone emotes for Ed McLemore at the Sportatorium. This is an unfortunate circumstance since the two of them might wreak havoc such as has seldom been seen outside of Elugelab.

Maiava is a temperamental, inarticulate savage with a penchant for stomping on bonfires and sharp nails and eating raw fish. Leone is a suave sophisticated man of the world who has a vast storehouse of words available on nearly any conceiveable subject. He has never stepped on so much as a match, although a time or two he has been victimized by other wrestlers via the hot foot. He hasn’t stepped on a sharp nail since his childhood in Oyster Bay, New York, and, except when he appears in the ring, he wears shoes. Maivia doesn’t wear shoes in or out of the ring.

Leone discovered Leone while attending Brown University and wrestling on the side. Maiava was discovered by a gentleman from Long Beach, Calif., named Coconut Willie, who heard of the prince via grapevine and journeyed all the way to Samoa to sign him to a wrestling conract.

Since Maiava’s English vocabulary is confined to three words – “eat, sleep, girls” – Coconut Willie must have used sign language to sign him. He directs Maiava in the ring via a Samoan war drum, beating a tattoo on it with his palms which means something to the prince and Willie but leaves their opponent bewitched, bothered and in the fierce clutches of Maiava.

On the few occasions when a mere human has triumphed over the untutored savage, it was because of foul play. The victors invariably deserted the ring to snatch the drum away from Willie and hide it. With no drum beat to advise him on the niceties of the strategy and tactics of the wrestling ring, Maiava was at the mercy of his ruthless foe and lost in a welter of confusion.

Since part of Maiava’s act is a sword dance performed either immediately preceding or following his engagement with another wrestler, ringside seats to his battles have become hard to sell. He performs the sword dance with two razor-sharp swords which he juggles with a rare insouciance and a perfect disregard for the customers. Once he adminstered a crew-cut to a row of seven customers with one fell swoop of a sword, but he has never injured a paying fan.

Maiava has an affinity for fresh fish as an item of diet. Recently, he journeyed with Coconut Willie to The Dallas News for an interview. While Willie went inside to locate a sports writer, Maiava remained in the car, dreaming of fresh fish. A wrestling fan began chivvying him – presumably via his own personal drum – producing a vast emotional upheaval in the savage breast. Although Maiava’s three-word vocabulary makes an interview simple, he became so upset he could not bring himself to face this writer and had to be shepherded to his hotel room by Coconut Willie. Three hours and several dozen fresh fish later, Willie called to say he had put out the fires and Maiava was calm enough to interview.

The interview was carried out in Maiava’s hotel room. The prince said, “Eat, sleep, girls,” stomped out a bonfire thoughtfully prepared by Willie on a slab of wood in the middle of the hotel room, and trod daintily on another slab of wod full of nails. It was an obvious effort for him to control his emotions.

Leone has never wrestled so savage a savage, although he once fought his way across the length and breadth of Africa. During this safari, he met and defeated Willie Liebenburg, the South African champion, and Gert Danhauser, champion of North Africa.

After these polar successes, he also met and defeated a leopard, which he first looked boldly in the eye, then shot. According to Antone, the lion is not really the king of beasts – he just has a good publicity man. The leopard, elephant and Cape buffalo are the most dangerous animals, not counting Samoan wrestlers or a chap named Jolly Midget Fisher.

Jolly Midget Fisher no longer wrestles, but his memory is green in the mind of Leone.

Fisher, according to Leone’s hospital records, is the roughest adversary he ever faced.

“He broke my left leg and subjected me to unimaginable tortures,” says Leone, simply. “He didn’t put me out of my misery fast enough.”

Leone’s brief tenure as a member of the New York State Legislature came as a strong protest against the governorship of Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

“I campaigned on an anti-Governor platforma nd was elected,” he says. “I made a ringing speech denouncing the Governor and his policies and resigned forthwith to return to wrestling.”

When he retires from the ring, Leone would like to run for Congress from Dallas. His platform is simple.

“I’m for McCarthy and against income tax,” he says. “I’m going to run as a representative of the Constitution party.”

TH: The sophistication of Leone is somewhat hard to believe, especially if you are privy to the letters written by Antone to Department of Justice officials and the Judge of the 1956 Antitrust case. In my opinion, the letters were written by a borderline psychotic - wishing death upon many people in the wrestling business. I guess he had a personal right to be angry and was fueled by the assumption of blacklisting, but he was WAY out there

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

06.12.2007 18:10 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 06.03.2006

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Kann ich mal fragen was es mit diesem "Bump" auf sich hat, das sehe schon zum dritten Mal in diesem Forum.

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06.12.2007 19:51 Adrian Adonis ist offline Beiträge von Adrian Adonis suchen Nehmen Sie Adrian Adonis in Ihre Freundesliste auf Füge Adrian Adonis in deine Contact-Liste ein AIM Screenname: W4EAdrianAdonis YIM Screenname: -
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

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Zitat:
Original von Adrian Adonis
Kann ich mal fragen was es mit diesem "Bump" auf sich hat, das sehe schon zum dritten Mal in diesem Forum.

“Bump” bedeutet das man ein Topic nach laengerer Zeit nach oben bringt.

In diesem Fall ist es aber so das das Peoplesboard manchmal nicht richtig funktioniert wenn man eine Antwort erstellt. Soll heissen man klickt auf den Button “Antwort erstellen“, und dann bricht der Browser ab beim erstellen der Antwort. Die folge davon ist, das die Antwort zwar gepostet wurde, und im Thread steht, aber das das Topic nicht nach oben gehollt wird, und die Antwort nicht in der Thread Uebersicht im Forum erscheint. Soll heissen, ausser mir haette niemand gesehen das die Antwort erstellt wurde, weil im Thread die letzte Antwort vom 25 November angezeigt wurde, und nicht die aktuelle Antwort die ich gepostet habe. Das Problem gibt es auf dem ganzen Forum abundzu, und es scheint immer ein paar Minuten aufzutretten, und dann wieder zu verschwinden. Jetzt kann ich zum Beispiel wieder das Bump Posting loeschen, weil jetzt zeigt es ja deine Antwort an.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

06.12.2007 23:27 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Minneapolis Tribune - 30 December 1934 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Minneapolis Tribune
Minneapolis, Minnesota
30 December 1934
George Barton Column


Shades of Frank Gotch! - the names of some of the holds used by our modern acrobatic wrestlers are strange to be sure. The late Wayne Munn used the slam hold to pin his opponents; Gus Sonnenberg conceived the flying tackle; Jim Londos the airplane spin; Ed Don George the backdrop; Joe Savoldi the dropkick; Abe Kashey the hit-kick-and-gouge; Joe Cox the Japanese cradle hold; and Man Mountain Dean the Blimp.

LOL

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

15.12.2007 17:27 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung Marshfield News - 21 September 1905 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Marshfield News
21 September 1905


Mob After Beell

Fred Beell and Harvey Parker, who are making a tour with a theatrical company, narrowly escaped violence at the hands of an infuriated mob one night last week. The outbreak occured at Cleveland at the close of a bout in which the local enthusiasts believed their favorite did not get fair play.

The crowd had started to beat down the theater door when the police arrived and escorted the wrestlers to their hotel.

It was a new and exciting experiance for Fred and friends here will await with interest his version of the affair.

The following is the dispatch from Cleveland dated Sept. 15:

"The police reserves were called out tonight to rescue Harvey Parker and Fred Beell with "Miss Ne wYork Jr," burlesque company. They have been meeting all comers at the Star this week, offering $25 o anyone they could not throw in 15 minutes.

Both men have been using tactic and tonight Beell threw his man with one shoulder off the mat. The crowd began to shout when Beell was given the decision and Mark Lamb, manager of Tom Jenkin's training quarters, punched Parker on the jaw and a great fight ensued on the stage. Peace was finally restored and then the audience swarmed around the stage door waiting for Parker and Beell

A riot call was sent in and a dozen policemen responded and scattered the crowd of 500 and escorted the wrestlers to their hotel. Doc Payne, trainer for the Cleveland baseball team, and himself a wrestler, went to Parker's rescue on the stage and was floored.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

25.12.2007 19:22 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung WHY PRO WRESTLING ATTRACTS RECORD-BREAKING CROWDS (1931) - Part 1 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Im Fruehling 1931 schrieb William Braucher einen sechs teiligen Artikel ueber den Wrestling Boom des Pro Wrestling damals. Es scheint das er viele der Zahlen von NY Promoter Jack Curley hat, aber viele davon sind anzuzweifeln oder falsch. Der Artikel fing an mit den Worten:”After years of unpopularity.” Und dann ging es weiter mit:”wrestling is undergoing a tremendous revival. These will be six articles revealing the scope of the modern mat game, studying the causes of its regeneration and investigating the conduct of matches as they are staged today.”

WHY PRO WRESTLING ATTRACTS RECORD-BREAKING CROWDS
1931
Newspaper Enterprise Association
William Braucher
Service Sports Editor


PART ONE

NEW YORK CITY -- From Cape Cod to the Golden Gate is a long way lined with rich cities filled with sports fans hungry for the thrills of violent action.

That is the golden highway wrestlers are riding today. And the reason is showmanship as fine as ever provided in a Belasco third act.

Meanwhile, boxing suffers in the throes of a self-inflicted depression -- and, while wrestlers ride, glove-wielders are walking on well-worn heels. Lackadaisical mitt programs have done much to kill that sport, but the grunt, creep and grimace of wrestling's unhappier day have been replaced by a headlong attack which has captured the public imagination. Into the new pattern of wrestling have been blended slapstick and sober-sided melodrama in an appealing and moving measure.

The only showmanship that seems to be omitted in the modern mat melee is perhaps the wearing of a Chaplin costume, the singing of a mammy song or the gunfire of road agents attacking the coach to Fargo. The rest of it seems to be all there.

The revival, gaining headway slowly all winter, burst into blossom shortly after the first of the year when thousands were turned away from Madison Square Garden, where one of the several world champions, Jim Londos, defended his title against Jim McMillen, square-shouldered plunger who used to run interference for Red Grange at the University of Illinois. More than 23,000 customers packed every cranny of the Garden, setting a new all-time attendance record for sporting events and bringing in a gate of $67,000.

The colorful Londos, ticketed with "the Greek God," "the Apollo," "the Adonis of the Arena," and various other catch-names, has gone up and down the country since then, defending his championship almost nightly in one city or another.

Some sort of world record was established by the Adonis recently when he was the main attraction at 10 shows in 10 different cities in 12 nights. The cities were Atlanta, Richmond, Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston, Chicago, St. Louis and Memphis. [Dates of these shows fell within the March 2-13, 1931, period.]

And in each of these cities the show was a sellout, the box office being closed before the show started!

Between January, 1930, and January, 1931, Londos alone will earn more than $300,000 at his present scale of wages. Already he has profited more than $100,000, and big outdoor matches are near.

In the few months that Don George held the title after winning it from Gus the Goat Sonnenberg, he collected $100,000 before losing recently to Strangler Lewis in a bout at Los Angeles.

With Londos earning $300,000 a year, how much is the public paying annually for the wrestling of other "champions," near champions, semi-finalists and preliminary puffers?

Figuring on gates in such cities as Los Angeles, Chicdago, Boston, New York, Denver, Kansas City, St. Louis, Cleveland, Buffalo, Montreal and Toronto ranging all the way from $10,000 to $75,000, it would not be hard for even a baseball umpire to see that the racket is pretty good pay.

The under-champions and semi-finalists, by dint of plugging, can earn all the way from $10,000 to $20,000 a year. Fifty to 60 per cent of the gates is divided among the performers, with the principals' share between 25 and 30 per cent of the gross, the semi-finalists drawing a 5 per cent end and the apprentices getting all the way from $50 to $300.

The frequency of the shows, indicated by Londos' successive one-night stands in various cities around one of the big wheels, and the showings of Strangler Lewis, the other champion, on the other circuit, prove that without doubt wrestling is "up in the bucks" -- and then some.

Meantime, events are moving toward an outdoor show on a scale undreamed of since the $100,000 Gotch-Hackenschmidt affair at White Sox Park in Chicago 20 years ago.
++++

PART TWO

NEW YORK CITY -- The prosperity of wrestling may be traced directly to the collapse of boxing that resulted from an epidemic of fouls and unsatisfactory fights.

But there is another source further back than that, traced to a squatty Dartmouth tackle, Gus Sonnenberg, who brought to the mat a new kind of onslaught in the flying tackle.

Three years ago, before a $70,000 house in Boston, Gus and his flying tackle rendered champion Strangler Lewis hors de combat. The young athlete from the Michigan iron and lumber country "carried the ball" across the country and back again on an end run that netted hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Sonnenberg was accused of faking practices. It was charged he wrestled Dan Koloff half a dozen times in different cities, with Koloff advertised under different names. Gus did not deny it, but told newspaper men that he had not known promoters were changing Koloff's name.

Sonnenberg, understand, was champion of what might be called the "American League" of wrestling, the Bowser-Sandow group with strongholds in Boston, Kansas City and along the Pacific coast. Meanwhile, in National League of wrestling, centered in New York and controlled by Jack Curley, a promoter for 40 years, was advancing the claims alternately of Hans Steinke, Richard Shikat and Jim Londos.

Curley, insisting that Sonnenberg "couldn't wrestle a lick," challenged him to meet any one of a dozen of his pachyderms, offering $50,000 if the man Gus chose should not be able to throw him twice in three minutes.

The challenge was not answered. Sonnenberg, working the charm of his flying tackle upon crowds from coast to coast, was reaping rich rewards. Other collegians began to follow his lead. It was but a short time until wrestling was crowded with young men from the colleges who brought to the mat gifts of swift, fierce action learned on the gridiron.

Wrestlers of all the "leagues" -- and the independents, such as Al Haft's man at Columbus, O., John Pesek -- copied the furious tactics of Gus the Goat. This stirring action went over big with the crowds. The "airplane slam," consisting of whirling the victim over one's head and flinging him with a crash to the canvas, was added to the repertoire and soon became a favorite stunt of the grunters.

The influx of college men continued until, today, there are more than 30 collegians on the big circuits, many of them wrestling three and four nights a week.

The latest recruits are Joe Savoldi, the former Notre Dame fullback, who has been "playing" for the Bowser-Sandow booking firm, and Len Macaluso, the Colgate All-America choice. Upon these college men such old wrestling entrepreneurs as Monsieur Curley look with a jaundiced eye, and with the comment, "they can't wrestle, but it is getting so that any 200-pounder from a college football field can pack a house."

The big college shot of the Curley herd at the moment is Ray Steele, from the University of California. Another on the Curley circuit is Billy Bartush, the former University of Illinois lineman.

Other collegians who now hold lucrative positions in the big leagues of wrestling are: Tiny Roebuck, Haskell; Jim McMillen, University of Illinois; Don George, Michigan; Hank Bruder, Northwestern; Ray Richards, Nebraska; Bibber McCoy, Holy Cross; Sun Jennings, Haskell; Joe Boyle, Columbia; Firpo Wilcox, Oklahoma; George Zaharias, Colorado and Ohio State; Herb Freeman, City College of New York; Earl McCready, Oklahoma A&M; Everett Marshall, Denver University; Father Lumpkin, Georgia Tech; Paul Harper, Southern Methodist; Lloyd Burdick, University of Illinois; Al Morelli, Boston College; Jack Williams, University of Pittsburgh; Willie Davis, University of Virginia; Paul Jones, Rice Institute; Bill Middlekauf, University of Florida; Dr. Ralph Wilson, University of Pennsylvania, and Al Pierotti, Boston College.

Sonnenberg's title passed to another collegian, Don George, in a bout at Los Angeles. Understand, this was the Sandow-Bowser title, not recognized by the Pennsylvania and New York athletic commissions. Challenges from Curley, couched in terms cajoling, failed to win a match for the Curley champion, Jim Londos, with Don George.

Then the title passed back to where it came from -- to Strangler Lewis. And the shouting from Monsieur Curley's crowd ceased abruptly. The Strangler was old -- but that headlock was just as young as ever.
++++

PART THREE

NEW YORK CITY -- College men have helped to revive wrestling. The decline of boxing interest also has been a factor. But there is another cause perhaps as great as either of these. It is showmanship.

Part of this showmanship is expressed in such rough-houise tactics as the flying tackle, flying mare and airplane spin, which have largely supplanted the immobile pulling and tugging of the tiresome past. Part of it is expressed in straight slapstick comedy. A great deal of the quality that Barnum worshiped is in the cast of characters of the act itself, which provides that one man must be a conniving, unscrupulous villain and his adversary the righeous, gracious, triumphant hero.

Take the fellow George Zaharias, Denver collegian. He is one of the villains of the east. One minute he is cringing in a corner against the ropes, his face expressing abject terror of his opponent. Then, suddenly, he is lashing out with a vicious blow that resounds through the hall as it bounces from our hero's manly bosom.

Villains also take every possible advantage of a situation, crawling along the floor to the ropes so the referee will break a painful hold once the villain's head is outside the ropes, as the rules specify.

At one time or another during the conduct of a match, the villain has the upper hand and the hall resounds with boos and jeers as he goes about his seemingly sinister business.

At another time the sneering rascal is being foiled at his own game. Thus, one night I watched Zaharias make seven slashing flying tackles aimed generally in the direction of Jim Londos. Londos nimbly sidestepped each crude plunge, and the rafters trembled with applause.

Again, the evil one, obtaining a cruel hold upon your hero, exhibits almost superhuman wickedness in pressing his torture to the utmost while Handsome Harry bravely and stoically submits to the punishment without a whisper.

It is the sheerest sort of silliness -- but it brings a crowd to its feet like no display of dispassionate scientific skill on the mat ever could. In fact, skill in wrestling today, the wrestlers themselves will admit, is almost entirely unappreciated.

The credo of the wrestling people seems to be that the public likes to be fooled, a belief not denied by the generous patronage the mat game is receiving from people in all walks of life, including the so-called intelligentsia.

"Exposure?" Jack Curley, master of a herd of pachyderms told me recently. "You can't expose anything nowadays. Rather, I mean you can expose and expose and expose and what does it get you?

"Chicago writers called the turn exactly on the recent Lewis-George matdch in Los Angeles in which the championship changed hands. Lewis was going to win back his title as a matter of expediency. The match turned out exactly as they prophesied."

You understand, of course, that Mr. Curley was referring to the Bowser-Sandow wrestling enterprises when he thus scathingly spoke. Mr. Curley, who presents Jim Londos as his world champoion, would not want to throw cold water on Mr. Bowser or Mr. Sandor or the Bowser-Sandow champion, "Strangler" Lewis. Of course not!

Added to the showmanship of villain vs. hero, there appear at nearly every wrestling show, in the preliminaries at least, a couple of monumental mountebanks whose playful absurdities roll dear old Gus Phann right out of his seat.

Stars of this branch of the trade are such men as Sergei Kalmikoff, the bearded Siberian. The present stunt is for his adversary to pull his whiskers. Another is Ferenc Holuban, who has no neck but manages to support in the style to which they have become accustomed seven separate and distinct stomachs. One of the villainous clown types (and a sure crowd pleaser, boys) is Rudy Dusek, the rough and rapacious roughneck rascal.

Even in a so-advertised championship match, there is a great deal of whoop-te-do about nothing before the serious business of throwing begins. There is much leaping and heaving of bodies -- often a wrestler is pitched through the ropes into the press box, or to the floor outside the ring.

When the men really get down to business, one of the favorite falls is the airplane spin. Your champion seizes his man, hoists him high over his head, whirls rapidly a couple of times and bangs the old boy to the mat with a resounding crash. Hooray!
++++

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

09.01.2008 08:07 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung WHY PRO WRESTLING ATTRACTS RECORD-BREAKING CROWDS (1931) - Part 2 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

PART FOUR

NEW YORK CITY -- There are two "big leagues" of wrestling, similar to the National and American Leagues in organized baseball. There is a third league, also, composed of independent promoters, managers and wrestlers. Mostly, the two big leagues grab the gravy.

The big man in what we shall call the National League is Jack Curley. There are two big men in the American League -- Paul Bowser and Billy Sandow. Sandow's former name is Billy Bauman, and he is one of the Bauman brothers of Rochester, where Jules Bauman is a promoter.

The alignments of the wrestlers themselves and their managers change swiftly from time to time, often so swiftly they are hard to follow. Thus, Ed White for years was a lieutenant of Billy Sandow, head of the western circuit. Now Ed White is manager of Jim Londos, the Curley champion.

There is mutual hatred between the two big leagues. Each at present has its champion. Strangler Lewis, though he lost to Henri Deglane when the Montreal commission allowed Deglane's claim that he had been bitten on the wrist, is the big shot of the Bowser-Sandow league. Jim Londos is the protagonist of the Curley organization. A story of recent events may help to illustrate the workings of the two cliques.

In January, 1929, Gus Sonnenberg won the world's heavyweight wrestling championship (except for New York and Pennsylvania) from Ed Lewis in Boston. Jack Curley always has insisted that Lewis deliberately let Sonnenberg win, that Sonnenberg can't wrestle a lick and that the proof lies in Gus' constant refusal of remunerative offers from Curley to meet any one of his men. Sonnenberg, avoiding Curley's wrestlers, reaped a rich harvest in Boston, Kansas City, Los Angeles and other cities while holding the championship. He was pursued by offers from Curley, but so long as he could play to gross gates of more than $3,000,000 by dint of wrestling the men of his own league, why should he harken to an outsider's proposition?

Wrestling champions, however, are subject to change. They work hard every night, play in many cities, and soon the fans begin to tire of this or that "champion's" style. It was only natural that recently Gus should lose his title to a slashing young collegian from Michigan, Don George -- of the Bowser-Sandow league, of course.

George held the title for a while, wrestled profitably in 100 cities and was beset by offers from Curley who offered his good men -- Londos, Steinke, Shikat, Szabo, Steele, Dusek, Freeman, Pojello or any other of a dozen wrestlers -- without avail, though an attractive bonus was offered.

It was not long until another changed seemed necessary in the Sandow-Bowser league. Lewis wrestled George in a match at Los Angeles and won his title back for the fourth or fifth time before a tremendous crowd at Wrigley Field.

Suddenly the challenges from Curley to the Bowser-Sandow group ceased. The reason may have been that Lewis had thrown the present Curley championship incumbent, Jim Londos, something like a dozen times. With the old Strangler walking the beat, danger and annoyance from Curley challenges were quickly done away with.

Curley's own explanation of his unwillingness to challenge Lewis was that Lewis is a crooked wrestler and he wants nothing to do with him. At any rate, prior to the last Lewis-George bout, in which the championship changed hands, the very thing that happened was predicted by several sports writers who have made a close study of wrestling alignments.

The promoter of the Los Angeles bouts in which title passed from hand to hand was Lou Daro. Like the other big shots in the big leagues of wrestling, Daro has had a colorful career. Eleven years ago he didn't have two dimes to rub against each other when, an ex-wrestler and vaudeville strong man, he went to Los Angeles. I think he hocked his shirt to promote his first wrestling match, an awful affair. In the last few years, this same Daro has grossed more than $3,000,000 in wrestling shows, using mostly the Bowser-Sandow pachyderms.
++++

PART FIVE

NEW YORK CITY -- The same men who shifted the puppets of the wrestling shows 20 years ago are behind the scenes today. The action and scenery are a little different, there is a bit more of comedy and a great deal more roughhouse -- but the theme is the same. That theme is hippodrome.

The only improvement I have found -- and the greatest factor in the present wave of wrestling popularity -- is that the modern wrestlers with their dash and go are better entertainers than the grunters and grimacers of a decade past.

The same routine is being followed today that was popular then. A wrestling champion doesn't last very long -- he can't last very long -- not only because the public constantly is demanding a new interest, but because the strain of constant travel and demands upon his physical self are too great to bear. Strangler Lewis has lost his title and regained it four times. A man just has to rest sometimes!

Rivival of a racket like wrestling depends upon new faces and changing styles. The lines of Punch and Judy must be changed once in a while. Jim Londos hasn't been the Curley champion very long now, but already fans in cities where he has shown half a dozen times are beginning to wonder how he manages to end all his matches with the same old airplane spin by which he whirls a brother pachyderm over his head a couple of times and slams him to the mat with a resounding crash. The first few times you see the airplane spin. It is thrilling -- all that flesh thudding to the floor in an inert mass and so on. But after you see it seven or eight times, worked with the same unvarying technique, ho hum! And a couple of well, wells!

When Lewis regained this title recently in Los Angeles from Don George, he really was only resuming his work where he left off when he lost to Sonnenberg early in 1929 before a $70,000 house in Boston. His vacation was over; he was back pounding the beat.


The fact is that Jim Londos, the Curley champion, recognized in New York and Pennsylvania, had been cutting seriously into the national wrestling surplus. Understand, Lewis had thrown Londos many, many times. With Lewis, the conqueror of Londos, champion again, the fans would scream for the Strangler. Besides, a rich field in New York City has been practically untouched by the Bowser-Sandow people. Now they are starting to go after the spoils here and in other Curley strongholds.

Thus, Illinois acted drastically after the Strangler had posted a forfeit and signified his willingness to meet this Londos champion. The substance of Illinois' action was that there can't be two wrestling champions defending their titles in that state. The problem was solved by declaring there is no wrestling champion at all, no not one.

You never know just what plan the men who control wrestling are hatching. From certain sources come tips to the effect that Ray Steele, the California collegian, is soon due to supplant Londos. There are other whisperings that Joe Savoldi is to become the Bowser-Sandow bell cow, since Lewis was so unfortunate as to lose his championship in Montreal to one Henri Deglane over the little matter of a bitten wrist.

As a rule, the lines of action of the big leagues of wrestling are fairly sharply defined, but I am told there have been some disagreements lately between Paul Bowser, manager of Don George, and Billy Sandow, the Strangler's head man. This dissension within the league may mean that the wrestlers of the Curley circuit will get more of a play on the Pacific Coast, up to this time a Boswer-Sandow shindig.

Lou Daro, the Los Angeles promoter who ran a shoestring into considerable hay putting on wrestling shows, recently visited New York and there is a possibility that he may change the cast at Los Angeles to include more of the Cutler herd. Los Angeles fans are beginning to catch on to the Bowser-Sandow curves.

In both the wrestling leagues, changes in the "championship" are soon due. It is not good policy to let a champion stay in there too long. That may help to explain why Mr. Lewis has won and lost the title four times. Can you imagine that sort of thing happening in boxing?

The story of Lewis' title the last few years is intriguing in more ways than one. You may remember that Lewis lost his title in Kansas City in 1925 to Wayne (Big) Munn. The mistake that Mr. Munn made was to wrestle Stan Zbyszko later in the same year. Jack Curley went to Zbyszko's corner, offered him a small fortune if he would throw Munn, and Zbyszko consented, making short work of Munn.

It was then claimed by Lewis that he had been fouled in the Munn match. In the same year, Stecher lifted "the title" from Zbyszko, so it became necessary for Lewis to wrestle Mr. Stecher in order to get back that championship.

Mr. Lewis did wrestle Mr. Stecher and won.
++++

PART SIX

NEW YORK CITY -- Wrestling comes and goes. Revivals even greater than the current upturn have been seen in the past. And each chapter ends with a note of disgust.

Wrestling prosperity will last just so long. Eventually the wrestlers slay themselves by their own cleverness. When things reach the stage of being "too good" -- such as the Gotch-Hackenschmidt match in Chicago twenty years ago, a match that grossed a gate of $94,000, wrestling falls into a swift decline.

"This year is nothing to get excited about," Jack Curley, who books a set of pachyderms out of New York and who stages the big shows here, told me the other day. "It will pass. Wrestling always has been an in-and-out sport. These revivals come in cycles of every five or six years. Then come the lean seasons. It has been that way as long as I can remember, and I have been promoting for forty years."

The fan never knows when he is seeing a square wrestling match. The same condition recently came into boxing. Most of the fights not only have been "in the bag" during the last few years but have been poor exhibitions in the bargain. Wrestling, even if most of the matches are alleged hippodrome, has sped the renunciation of boxing by appealing with slashing drama, with big bodies spinning through the air in onslaughts crude and fierce enough to understand.

There is bound to be hippodroming while the wrestling world is divided among so few men. Jack Curley heads one league of grapplers. Paul Bowser and Billy Sandow are the chieftains of another set of champions. Too many men are working for the same employer to make any of the matches within the league do-or-die struggles. These men are maneuvered about as so many elephants building an ancient temple to some Egyptian deity.

Day after day now, the results of matches in the principal cities are being printed. The wrestling fan, after seeing a few of these, quickly learns what it is all about. He reads that Londos has just thrown Zaharias in St. Louis. Well, well, and just a week or two ago he saw Londos throw Zaharias in Cleveland.

Repetition of stunts within each of the big leagues soon palls upon the paying clientele. Even the most avid action loses its charm when tinged by the suspicion that it has been rehearsed.

Years ago when Paul Bowser, the big shot of New England wrestling, was getting his start in Boston, he was the hero of a vaudeville wrestling show in which the gladiator offered to throw anybody in the house. Sometimes a woman would come up out of the audience to do battle with him. The action was spirited and all that, the lady giving the gentleman all he could do to master her, but after the customers learned that Cora Livingston, the wrestlerette, was Mrs. Paul Bowser, enthusiasm for the skit lost much of its savor.

Recently Bowser was manager of Don George and had a finger in the till of many fat houses from coast to coast. His friend, Billy Sandow, manager of Strangler Lewis, has been a power in western wrestling for years.

It has been said before in these articles that changes are due in the championships of the big leagues. Ray Steele is being groomed for the crown in Jack Curley's organization. Joe Savoldi is expected to win the title to the Bowser-Sandow circuit.

Will these two men meet? Well, not just now.

That would be a "world series" between the two leagues and it would be staged only if a gate of at least $100,000 could be assured. The time is not yet ripe for such an enterprise.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

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Achtung Dixon Telegraph - 9 November 1948 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Dixon Telegraph
Dixon, Illinois
9 November 1948


New Mat War “Superman” Rivals ‘Gorgeous George’

New York – (NEA) – George Wagner let his blond hair grow, had it marcelled, acquired a wardrobe and a valet, took the name Gorgeous George, and became the most magnetic attraction in wrestling by at least three to one.

Gorgeous George, the mat darling of the Hollywood picture colony, was such big business by the tim ehe come east for the first time that Toots Mondt, who obtained the rights on him walked out on his New York partners, Al Mayer and Willie Johnston.

Unable to book Gorgeous George, the Mayer-Johnston axis bobbed up with Golden Superman – real name Walter Podolak.

Gorgeous George bounces into the battle pit clad in a taffeta-quilted robe worked in sequins, wide sash and side drapery to slenderize the waistline. He doesn’t go to work until his man sprays the canvas with a disinfectant. My my!

Golden Superman hops the hemp in a golden harness matching his hair, strikes more magnificent poses than did Mussolini.

Thus the rasslin’ dodge becomes even more amusing, with attire supplementing the acrobatics and histrionics.

Gorgeous George, an Oregonian, struggled along for 15 years. He got the resplendency idea from a grappler who called himself Lord Landsdown, old bean, and climbed into the enclosure with a monocle.

He appeared in and around Los Angeles until the movie crowd picked him up very much in the same manner that Mysterious Montague, the trick golfer and strong man, was endorsed several years back.

Gorgeous George and his curls and perfume were made when he appeared on radio programs with Bob Hope, Gary Cooper, Eddie Cantor and Burt Lancaster. And why not? He can out-act all of them. At a recent benefit in Los Angeles, he wrestled Lancaster and Hope was his valet. The newsreel people photographed him.

Gorgeous George spent considerable money on clothes and robes, and worked at being a dude like Lucius Beche. It’s no eacy matter to go to a hair dresser daily – ask the missus – then have to pull and tug at night.

Golden Superman, a squatty Pole out of Syracuse, but no sap, has been applying hammers and locks for 16 years. He holds weight-lifting titles.

“Gorgeous George has no physique,” says Golden Superman. “He’s all in one hunk.”

Gorgeous George and Golden Superman aren’t freaks in the strict sense, but the one had better streer clear of a Delilah and the other simply has to be harnessed like a trotter.

Professional wrestling isn’t dead.

Gorgeous George and Golden Superman make it livelier and funnier than ever.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

12.01.2008 17:00 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung New York Daily News - 30 July 1982 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

New York Daily News
New York City, New York
30 July 1982


harold t. sakata dies

honolulu (ap) -- harold t. sakata, 62, an actor best known for his sinister characterizationof the killer bodyguard 'oddjob' in the james bond movie 'goldfinger', died yesterday (july 29) after a long bout with cancer. sakata won an olympic silver medal ion 1948 for weightlifting and wrestled professionally under the name 'tosh togo' before starting his acting career.

one day in the early 1960s, producer harry saltzman and director guy hamilton, discovered sakata when they saw him wrestling on television in london.

"they came to me and told me that they thought i would be right for the role of oddjob," sakata later told a reported. "i refused at first because i thought i was supposed to be kicked around by james bond. that would be bad for my image as a wrestler."

when he learned he would be dishing it out, sakata accepted the role.

as the formally dressed bodyguard, oddjob killer by decaptitating people with his steel-rimmed, razor sharp bowler hat.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

24.01.2008 20:10 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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Dabei seit: 29.04.2002

Achtung The Daily Review - 17 December 1904 Zitatantwort auf diesen Beitrag erstellen Diesen Beitrag editieren/löschen Diesen Beitrag einem Moderator melden       IP Information Zum Anfang der Seite springen

Tyson vs Holyfield im Jahr 1904 großes Grinsen

Decatur, Illinois
The Daily Review
17 December 1904


Terrible Algerian Proves A Cannibal

Jenkins Awarded Match After Black Wrestler Chewed Him Up
San Francisco, Dec. 17. The wrestling match between Tom Jenkins and Buzayell, the Algerian, was given to Jenkins on a foul. After a struggle of two hours, Jenkins secured a hammerlock and as he was brining the Algerian over both rolled off the platform and fell to the floor.

When the men got on their feet there was a large sized piece of cuticle missing from Jenkins abdomen. There were also teeth prints in his arms where he had been bitten by Buzayell.

Referee Coche awarded the match to Jenkins and the police placed Buzayell under arrest on a charge of mayhem.

__________________
“If there are no rules, there's no cheating.
If there's no cheating, there's no heat.
If there's no heat...who cares?”
Bobby Heenan

28.01.2008 08:00 Nefercheperur ist offline Email an Nefercheperur senden Beiträge von Nefercheperur suchen Nehmen Sie Nefercheperur in Ihre Freundesliste auf
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